Review 5: George R. R. Martin’s ‘A Clash of Kings’

The second book in Martin’s famous fantasy series is ‘A Clash of Kings’. The form is the same as the first novel in the series, an interweaving, multi-perspective, chaotic, but somehow ordered narrative which is very easy to get lost in it. Personally, I love Martin’s writing style. I love having plenty of perspectives to read from, it’s as if he wrote the characters’ stories separately and managed to fit them all together in one big epic jigsaw puzzle.

This is the book in which things really start to get moving, civil war grips the Seven Kingdoms and other factions from across the sea look across with massive ambition. The sheer number of tense moments and instances of frighteningly well described action just seems to keep on increasing as the series goes on so far. Simply put, it’s an intense read.

However, it’s not all action in the fantasy world. A lot of thought has gone into the well written, intellectual dialogue. It’s not hard to see when one of the characters is under stress, is using sarcasm, or is just annoyed. Martin’s plethora of characters (and I don’t use the word plethora lightly) are so well-rounded and realistic that I sometimes find myself thinking things like this:

“Joffrey you bastard! What have you done?”

“Aww, poor Sansa.”

“I hope Dany pulls through this.”

Etc, etc….

The text also raises similar issues as before: whether one man has the right to rule a whole kingdom, whether women should be subjugated my men; whether money triumphs over honour; and whether your heritage gives you right to rule. The answer to all of the above, is no. Sometimes however, life isn’t fair, and that is what this book seems to drive home with every chapter. Some rulers aren’t fit to rule, women are subjugated in certain ways and in certain countries more than others, honour and love do not always win over money, and some people are born into power.

If you’re interested, I will be covering each book in the series over the next few weeks so make sure you come back next Monday, if you subscribe you’ll get an email every time I post so you won’t miss a thing. Thank you for reading.

My First Haikus

Poetry today,

So I wrote some short Haikus.

I posted them here.

 

The Cherry Blossom.

Pink petals fall to the ground,

Dancing in the wind.

 

The Quarter Pounder,

Unnecessary gherkin.

Arteries thicken.

 

Said the Queen to Ned:

When you play the game of thrones,

You win or you die.

 

Please like or comment,

I hope you liked my Haikus.

Come back tomorrow.

The Detective

On the seventh floor of a four star hotel in London, a detective marched down the hallway. He had been called from his bed, from his wife, for a suicide; he was angry to say the least. Inspector Barker met him at the hotel room door; its inscription read 7B. David, the detective, shuddered. It was following him, he was sure of it now. The apartment in the West End had been 7B, and the gun that was used to kill Mary was inscribed with the hellish, mortifying, 7B.

David calmed himself. “Inspector Barker” he said in greeting, “what’s going on? Where’s the rest of the force?”

Barker shook his head, “There have been a few, developments…we need you to take a look at this, I sent the rest home, didn’t want them getting in your way.”

“Then let’s take a look” said David, trying to keep his composure. The room was stale; blood had dried into the carpet beneath a young man’s head. It looked like he had put a gun into his mouth, just as the report suggested.

David scoured the room for details but saw none. He began to turn back to Barker, “What exactly am I supp-” Stopping mid-sentence David sighed, Barker was pointing his gun at the detective’s head.

“Read this” said Barker as he handed David a note splashed with blood, “they want you to know before you die.” He read the note aloud:

They found me, I thought I was safe. I’m taking the easy way out. I won’t be like them. I won’t turn into one of THEM! 7B started this, and it will end it…

Terrified, David managed to utter three words, “What are, they?”

Barker laughed, “That’s for me to know, and you to find out.”

In his final moments David heard what had been irritating him at home, and at work; a scuttle, like that of a beetle, across the windowpane. Full of fear, he tried to look at the window behind him, but he fell to floor before he saw them, dead.

Finding Inspiration

I’ve often wondered what the best way to gain inspiration is. However, I’ve recently come to realise that inspiration comes from everything and anything. Recently, I’ve been inspired by rain on my window, a noise I heard on the street, my pets, and countless different books and TV programmes.

Everything is inspirational, in fact I believe even a plain cardboard box can be if you allow it to be. Anything can be a symbol of something else. A rose is a symbol of love and pain at the same time, depending on your viewpoint.

Of course, experience helps, travelling is probably my favourite way to be inspired; there’s nothing like a wholly different area, lifestyle, and set of traditions to inspire your ‘inner writer’. It allows you to see the world in a new light and to judge things differently; just like you do when you write from a new character’s perspective, the world appears altered.

So when you’re stuck for inspiration and suffering from writer’s block, don’t look for grand story lines and well rounded characters. All you have to do is look outside your window for something that makes you think. Maybe it’ll be a bird, or an old woman, a car driving too fast, or your own reflection. Let me know what you see.

Good luck and keep writing. Thank you for reading.

H2O – A Poem Of Love

You’re stuck to my window,

Never far from sight,

You’re in my heart, body, and mind,

Without you, I’d be dead and blind.

 

If I couldn’t touch you with my lips,

Kiss you softly and drink you in,

My throat would cry out for you,

Cry for your deep pools of blue.

 

I’m sorry I ignored you,

And placed my hood above my head,

I’m here for you now,

I know we had a row,

But you did mess up my bathroom floor…

Expansion

I thought after my post on internet writing a few hours ago that I would like to expand my blog’s audience. So, I’m just letting you all know that I’ve created a Tumblr blog, and a Twitter account to go alongside my WordPress. This won’t affect my daily posts as each site will publish the same content; if you would like to see the new page the links are below, feel free to like, follow, and share til your heart’s content. Be warned, they aren’t much to look at yet.

Twitter

Tumblr

Thank you for reading.

Why You Should Write On The Internet

Over the past few weeks I’ve gained an insight into the world of creative writing on the internet. It’s been fairly rewarding so far; it has given me the opportunity to write so much more than I ever have before. I used to write once a week at most, but my new blog has encouraged me to write almost every day, and it has allowed me to experiment.

Before joining the blogging community I thought of myself as a prose writer who would write poetry if I had to, but now I think my skills in the two areas are pretty well matched. In fact, I would go as far as to say that I prefer my poetry to my prose in most cases. Now that is a strange feeling; it’s as if my whole world has shifted a little – I know, I know, it sounds dramatic, but really, it’s a massive change.

But enough about me, this post is about you! So here are five reasons you should publish your writing on the internet…

1 – You have to start somewhere

Everyone has to start somewhere; most plumbers start as an apprentice, every teacher starts as a student, and a lot of writers start on the internet. Don’t think that by starting a blog you’ll become a famous writer some day, it’s still going to be hard work, but a blog might just be the push you need to make a start on your first novel; it was for me, I’m hoping to have my first draft done by the end of summer.

2 – It gives you a sense of satisfaction

There’s nothing like posting on the internet, especially if you post frequently. I post every day, and although it can get stressful at times, I love it. But there’s one thing that’s more satisfying than completing and uploading a post. It’s completing a post, uploading it, waiting, checking your blog, and finding tons of notifications. Now that’s satisfaction.

3 – You’ll gain your first readers

They may not number in the millions, but I have developed a (very) slight following which means that whenever I post a new piece of writing, at least fifty people are guaranteed to receive an email about it. Out of those fifty, twenty may take the time to read it, and maybe only two will like it, but those two likes mean a lot. If no one ever liked any of my posts, I would probably shut down my blog, but I think I’ll hang on just a little while longer; it’s great knowing people read and like what I have to say.

4 – It builds your confidence

I know when I first started out writing, I was nervous about showing any of it to my parents. In fact when my Granddad dies a few years ago I wrote a poem about him which I immediately hid and now cannot find because I didn’t want anyone to read it. Today, my confidence has grown massively, I mean just look at me, I’m posting my writing for the whole world to see, and I’m loving every moment of it.

5 – You’ll improve!

Finally, and probably most importantly, you’ll improve. No one wants to post bad writing where hundreds of people can see it, it’s embarrassing, so you’ll end up pushing yourself to do better every time. If you’re like me, working under stress will make your writing ten times better, so try setting yourself a challenge. Gradually you’ll see improvement in your style, grammar, dialogue, diction, and overall, you’ll feel a lot better about your chances of ‘making it’ in the world of writing.