The Web Series

Until recently I had never seen a web series, and considered them tiny blots on the genre of television and screenplay.  However, I recently discovered a series called ‘The Guild’, written by Felicia Day (I have to thank my friend Sam over at Swartech; he’d kill me if I took the credit for discovering her work by myself). You can find the guild on Felicia’s YouTube channel, Geek and Sundry, I took the liberty of providing you with a link, but be warned, it’s incredibly addictive.

The reason I’m writing about this is because I feel web series have their own part in the vast area of literature known as drama. Drama is one of the oldest forms of writing; it was a major part of Ancient Greek tradition and religion, just like it is now in our traditions of sitting together as a family and watching the latest episode of our favourite programme. Drama has evolved immensely with the invention of television, and now it can evolve with the internet, thus the web series was born.

My interest in web series is not purely due to my interest in studying literature, I am also drawn to it because of my writing. Writing a web series would be incredibly rewarding, but I feel the need for actors and expensive equipment might get in the way. However a written web series might be a good idea. Obviously I’m still in the planning stages but I think a series of flash fiction pieces which link together to form one storyline, perhaps published on a WordPress blog might be in order. Maybe even the purchase of a webcam for some kind of diary entry account of a narrative which occurs off-screen (although I can’t act, well…I’ve never tried it but I can’t imagine it would go well).

Anyway, I’m getting ahead of myself. Let me know what you think, if you have an opinion, or if you have any suggestions that might help me with the development of this project. As always, thanks for reading.

Another World

Rich and poor,

Businessmen don’t sleep on the floor,

Like the children,

Like the elderly.

 

Gold and mud,

They’d be happy for a flood,

Leave the children

Leave the elderly.

 

Brick and straw,

The rich always want more,

Exploit the children,

Exploit the elderly.

 

Medicine and blood,

No one helps but they should,

Help the children,

Help the elderly.

 

Help them all.

The 5 Best Things About Film Adaptations

5 – Brings the book to a wider audience

A lot of books go unnoticed, but when a Hollywood film director gets hold of a good one they think will do well, you can guarantee a lot of attention. I’m betting Twilight more than tripled its sales numbers after the release of the first film, and the same goes for Harry Potter. Also, a lot of people just don’t like reading, (I know, I don’t get it either) so a film allows a novelist’s audience to expand beyond the normal possibilities.

4 – People get to see a different take on a book

When you read a book, you get to picture all of the characters yourself; you are like a builder and the writer is an architect. But when you watch a film adaptation, it’s like moving into a house you asked someone else to design and build for you. It’s nice to get someone else’s take on a book for a change, however, nothing can beat your original ideas when reading a book.

3 – There are no more advantages to making a film adaptation!

Let’s be honest, film adaptations aren’t usually great. Sometimes, a Harry Potter comes along, or a Sherlock Holmes, but usually, they’re terrible; this is especially true if you’ve read the book before watching the film. I remember when I went to see ‘Angels and Demons’ a few years ago, I remember being angry, very angry. The main antagonist wasn’t even the same person!

Anyway, after that, thanks for reading. Oh, and feel free to add your points about film adaptations in the comments below.

Dreams of Flight

Once he had finally fallen asleep, Alex began to float peacefully on a sea of dreams. That is, until the water became land. Inside his own mind Alex ran, he saw flashes, pictures of dreams he had dreamt in the past, and those he had not yet conceived. Finally, one caught his eye, and once again, his dream world shifted.

He was flying. A long, torn, black cape attached to his shoulders was being dragged and twisted behind him. Suddenly he was aware that he was chasing something, a jet. Straining muscles that could never have existed in an ordinary human, Alex sped up, quickly gaining on his target.

Small suckers grew on the palm of his hands before he latched onto the outside of the cockpit. The pilot, a balding man with more hair on his chin than on his head looked up in surprise; he began to descend immediately, trying to shake Alex off. The newly grown suckers strained but stayed in place as Alex watched his biceps grow

When he was ready, Alex pulled the cockpit door off its hinges, and grabbed hold of the man within. He was terrified, but no matter how loud he forced his voice in desperate bargaining, the jet engine’s roar drowned him out. Before flying to the ground, Alex pushed the joystick forward, sending the plane plummeting toward the city.

Alex was fast, he was down in the streets before the jet was halfway to the ground. Once he had handed the man over to the police, he flew back into the air. Again, he began to expand his muscles. He became a huge, hulking mass, floating above even the tallest city skyscraper.

The jet was falling at an alarming rate, and even Alex was worried he wouldn’t catch it for a second, but he did. Slowly he allowed it to push him down to the roof of a nearby tower block, where he extended his arm into the cockpit, and switched off the engine.

That is where the dream ended, Alex’s alarm woke him up; it was 7.30am. He got out of bed and walked to the bathroom to wash his face. Looking in the mirror, he noticed he had changed in in his sleep. Suckers covered his palms, and his muscles were huge.

“Shit” he muttered, “I have to stop doing that.”

Review 5: George R. R. Martin’s ‘A Clash of Kings’

The second book in Martin’s famous fantasy series is ‘A Clash of Kings’. The form is the same as the first novel in the series, an interweaving, multi-perspective, chaotic, but somehow ordered narrative which is very easy to get lost in it. Personally, I love Martin’s writing style. I love having plenty of perspectives to read from, it’s as if he wrote the characters’ stories separately and managed to fit them all together in one big epic jigsaw puzzle.

This is the book in which things really start to get moving, civil war grips the Seven Kingdoms and other factions from across the sea look across with massive ambition. The sheer number of tense moments and instances of frighteningly well described action just seems to keep on increasing as the series goes on so far. Simply put, it’s an intense read.

However, it’s not all action in the fantasy world. A lot of thought has gone into the well written, intellectual dialogue. It’s not hard to see when one of the characters is under stress, is using sarcasm, or is just annoyed. Martin’s plethora of characters (and I don’t use the word plethora lightly) are so well-rounded and realistic that I sometimes find myself thinking things like this:

“Joffrey you bastard! What have you done?”

“Aww, poor Sansa.”

“I hope Dany pulls through this.”

Etc, etc….

The text also raises similar issues as before: whether one man has the right to rule a whole kingdom, whether women should be subjugated my men; whether money triumphs over honour; and whether your heritage gives you right to rule. The answer to all of the above, is no. Sometimes however, life isn’t fair, and that is what this book seems to drive home with every chapter. Some rulers aren’t fit to rule, women are subjugated in certain ways and in certain countries more than others, honour and love do not always win over money, and some people are born into power.

If you’re interested, I will be covering each book in the series over the next few weeks so make sure you come back next Monday, if you subscribe you’ll get an email every time I post so you won’t miss a thing. Thank you for reading.

My First Haikus

Poetry today,

So I wrote some short Haikus.

I posted them here.

 

The Cherry Blossom.

Pink petals fall to the ground,

Dancing in the wind.

 

The Quarter Pounder,

Unnecessary gherkin.

Arteries thicken.

 

Said the Queen to Ned:

When you play the game of thrones,

You win or you die.

 

Please like or comment,

I hope you liked my Haikus.

Come back tomorrow.

The Detective

On the seventh floor of a four star hotel in London, a detective marched down the hallway. He had been called from his bed, from his wife, for a suicide; he was angry to say the least. Inspector Barker met him at the hotel room door; its inscription read 7B. David, the detective, shuddered. It was following him, he was sure of it now. The apartment in the West End had been 7B, and the gun that was used to kill Mary was inscribed with the hellish, mortifying, 7B.

David calmed himself. “Inspector Barker” he said in greeting, “what’s going on? Where’s the rest of the force?”

Barker shook his head, “There have been a few, developments…we need you to take a look at this, I sent the rest home, didn’t want them getting in your way.”

“Then let’s take a look” said David, trying to keep his composure. The room was stale; blood had dried into the carpet beneath a young man’s head. It looked like he had put a gun into his mouth, just as the report suggested.

David scoured the room for details but saw none. He began to turn back to Barker, “What exactly am I supp-” Stopping mid-sentence David sighed, Barker was pointing his gun at the detective’s head.

“Read this” said Barker as he handed David a note splashed with blood, “they want you to know before you die.” He read the note aloud:

They found me, I thought I was safe. I’m taking the easy way out. I won’t be like them. I won’t turn into one of THEM! 7B started this, and it will end it…

Terrified, David managed to utter three words, “What are, they?”

Barker laughed, “That’s for me to know, and you to find out.”

In his final moments David heard what had been irritating him at home, and at work; a scuttle, like that of a beetle, across the windowpane. Full of fear, he tried to look at the window behind him, but he fell to floor before he saw them, dead.