The 5 Best Things About Film Adaptations

5 – Brings the book to a wider audience

A lot of books go unnoticed, but when a Hollywood film director gets hold of a good one they think will do well, you can guarantee a lot of attention. I’m betting Twilight more than tripled its sales numbers after the release of the first film, and the same goes for Harry Potter. Also, a lot of people just don’t like reading, (I know, I don’t get it either) so a film allows a novelist’s audience to expand beyond the normal possibilities.

4 – People get to see a different take on a book

When you read a book, you get to picture all of the characters yourself; you are like a builder and the writer is an architect. But when you watch a film adaptation, it’s like moving into a house you asked someone else to design and build for you. It’s nice to get someone else’s take on a book for a change, however, nothing can beat your original ideas when reading a book.

3 – There are no more advantages to making a film adaptation!

Let’s be honest, film adaptations aren’t usually great. Sometimes, a Harry Potter comes along, or a Sherlock Holmes, but usually, they’re terrible; this is especially true if you’ve read the book before watching the film. I remember when I went to see ‘Angels and Demons’ a few years ago, I remember being angry, very angry. The main antagonist wasn’t even the same person!

Anyway, after that, thanks for reading. Oh, and feel free to add your points about film adaptations in the comments below.

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Review 3: Henry James’ ‘The Turn of the Screw’

If you’re looking for a short story with a bit of ambiguity, read this book. On the face of it, it seems like a simple ghost story, but with a little digging, a whole world of interpretation becomes apparent. The ghosts for example, are they real or are they apparitions of the governess’ creation? How and why does the event involving Miles happen at the end? I won’t ruin it for you just in case you decide to give it a read. Seriously though, it’ll only take you two or three hours tops, and it’s right here for all the world to see (psst, click the link and read it…not that I’m forcing you or anything).

Being one of the few people who have written a 2500 word essay on the uncanny in Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw only yesterday, you would think that I would hate it by now, which I don’t. Now that has to be a good sign. I would give you all the link to read it but I don’t think many would so there’s not much point; if you do however feel a desperate urge to hear my thoughts on the uncanny in this novel, and Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus, you are more than welcome to ask and I will post it (be warned it is heavy reading).

Before you pass my rants of as the ramblings of a strange and lonely English student obsessed with obscure literature, consider this; I’m not the only one who likes this book. In fact, even if you’ve never heard of it, I would be willing to bet a lot of money that you already like it. It has been adapted into so many films it’s unbelievable. Obviously, The Turn of the Screw is one, but The Innocents, Presence of Mind, In a Dark Place, among many others the most famous is probably The Others.

So, in a nutshell, get reading!

Review 1: Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga Part 2

So last week I talked about the underlying themes of the Twilight Saga as I see them: anti-feminism and sexual restraint. It’s not just me who believes this by the way, arguments like mine are plastered all over the Internet on sites like WordPress and Wikipedia.

Moving on from that, I finished last time with a quote from Stephen King:

“Stephenie Meyer can’t write worth a darn. She’s not very good.”

This is an opinion I share in so many ways that if I listed them this post would take five years to read! Ok, I’m exaggerating, but still, King’s right. The description is lacking, the dialogue is unrealistic and repetitive, the characters aren’t well shaped at all, and the narrative voice is pathetically weak.

As the books are written from Bella’s perspective, it’s possible to argue that because Meyer may have intended Bella to be a ‘stripped-down’ character, she is incapable of describing the world around her in a well-formed manner. To be honest though, I think Meyer just isn’t very good at writing; she had never written anything before Twilight, that’s just not fair!

I’ll be truthful, I’m jealous and I wish my writing would be noticed in the same way. Although I would prefer to be noticed on the merit of my writing, not the possible popularity of my book due to underlying sexual themes which young teenage girls can relate to. Oh and the attractive actors who play the main characters in the film, which shouldn’t have been made in the first place.

In summary, Stephenie Meyer is a woman who can market herself very well considering that what she’s marketing goes against popular culture, and that her writing style is under-developed and downright shoddy. She should have gone into advertising…God I wish she’d gone into advertising…