The Web Series

Until recently I had never seen a web series, and considered them tiny blots on the genre of television and screenplay.  However, I recently discovered a series called ‘The Guild’, written by Felicia Day (I have to thank my friend Sam over at Swartech; he’d kill me if I took the credit for discovering her work by myself). You can find the guild on Felicia’s YouTube channel, Geek and Sundry, I took the liberty of providing you with a link, but be warned, it’s incredibly addictive.

The reason I’m writing about this is because I feel web series have their own part in the vast area of literature known as drama. Drama is one of the oldest forms of writing; it was a major part of Ancient Greek tradition and religion, just like it is now in our traditions of sitting together as a family and watching the latest episode of our favourite programme. Drama has evolved immensely with the invention of television, and now it can evolve with the internet, thus the web series was born.

My interest in web series is not purely due to my interest in studying literature, I am also drawn to it because of my writing. Writing a web series would be incredibly rewarding, but I feel the need for actors and expensive equipment might get in the way. However a written web series might be a good idea. Obviously I’m still in the planning stages but I think a series of flash fiction pieces which link together to form one storyline, perhaps published on a WordPress blog might be in order. Maybe even the purchase of a webcam for some kind of diary entry account of a narrative which occurs off-screen (although I can’t act, well…I’ve never tried it but I can’t imagine it would go well).

Anyway, I’m getting ahead of myself. Let me know what you think, if you have an opinion, or if you have any suggestions that might help me with the development of this project. As always, thanks for reading.

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Why You Should Write On The Internet

Over the past few weeks I’ve gained an insight into the world of creative writing on the internet. It’s been fairly rewarding so far; it has given me the opportunity to write so much more than I ever have before. I used to write once a week at most, but my new blog has encouraged me to write almost every day, and it has allowed me to experiment.

Before joining the blogging community I thought of myself as a prose writer who would write poetry if I had to, but now I think my skills in the two areas are pretty well matched. In fact, I would go as far as to say that I prefer my poetry to my prose in most cases. Now that is a strange feeling; it’s as if my whole world has shifted a little – I know, I know, it sounds dramatic, but really, it’s a massive change.

But enough about me, this post is about you! So here are five reasons you should publish your writing on the internet…

1 – You have to start somewhere

Everyone has to start somewhere; most plumbers start as an apprentice, every teacher starts as a student, and a lot of writers start on the internet. Don’t think that by starting a blog you’ll become a famous writer some day, it’s still going to be hard work, but a blog might just be the push you need to make a start on your first novel; it was for me, I’m hoping to have my first draft done by the end of summer.

2 – It gives you a sense of satisfaction

There’s nothing like posting on the internet, especially if you post frequently. I post every day, and although it can get stressful at times, I love it. But there’s one thing that’s more satisfying than completing and uploading a post. It’s completing a post, uploading it, waiting, checking your blog, and finding tons of notifications. Now that’s satisfaction.

3 – You’ll gain your first readers

They may not number in the millions, but I have developed a (very) slight following which means that whenever I post a new piece of writing, at least fifty people are guaranteed to receive an email about it. Out of those fifty, twenty may take the time to read it, and maybe only two will like it, but those two likes mean a lot. If no one ever liked any of my posts, I would probably shut down my blog, but I think I’ll hang on just a little while longer; it’s great knowing people read and like what I have to say.

4 – It builds your confidence

I know when I first started out writing, I was nervous about showing any of it to my parents. In fact when my Granddad dies a few years ago I wrote a poem about him which I immediately hid and now cannot find because I didn’t want anyone to read it. Today, my confidence has grown massively, I mean just look at me, I’m posting my writing for the whole world to see, and I’m loving every moment of it.

5 – You’ll improve!

Finally, and probably most importantly, you’ll improve. No one wants to post bad writing where hundreds of people can see it, it’s embarrassing, so you’ll end up pushing yourself to do better every time. If you’re like me, working under stress will make your writing ten times better, so try setting yourself a challenge. Gradually you’ll see improvement in your style, grammar, dialogue, diction, and overall, you’ll feel a lot better about your chances of ‘making it’ in the world of writing.